The Deus Vult Podcast

Catholic Psychology with Rudolf Allers

March 09, 2021 The Deus Vult Podcast Episode 25
The Deus Vult Podcast
Catholic Psychology with Rudolf Allers
Chapters
The Deus Vult Podcast
Catholic Psychology with Rudolf Allers
Mar 09, 2021 Episode 25
The Deus Vult Podcast

Dr. Rudolf Allers, a Catholic Psychologist, earned his M.D. at the University of Vienna. He was a field physician during World War I, which led him to study the effect of head trauma on human personality and behavior. In his study of psychology, he was one of the last students of Sigmund Freud, though he would later criticize Freud's theory from both scientific and religious perspectives.  Allers emigrated to the United States due to his ousting by the Third Reich and took professorships at both The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University. He was well versed in Psychology, Philosophy, and Morals, writing articles and books about self improvement from a Catholic outlook, especially encouraging a growth in virtue in the development of one's personality.
 This episode honors the work of Dr. Allers and encourages, contrary to social stigma, the use of therapy as a valid form of medicine when paired with a Catholic anthropology.

Show Notes

Dr. Rudolf Allers, a Catholic Psychologist, earned his M.D. at the University of Vienna. He was a field physician during World War I, which led him to study the effect of head trauma on human personality and behavior. In his study of psychology, he was one of the last students of Sigmund Freud, though he would later criticize Freud's theory from both scientific and religious perspectives.  Allers emigrated to the United States due to his ousting by the Third Reich and took professorships at both The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University. He was well versed in Psychology, Philosophy, and Morals, writing articles and books about self improvement from a Catholic outlook, especially encouraging a growth in virtue in the development of one's personality.
 This episode honors the work of Dr. Allers and encourages, contrary to social stigma, the use of therapy as a valid form of medicine when paired with a Catholic anthropology.